War Room

In the War Room you will find memorabilia from the War of 1812 to present day.  You can learn hoe to ration like they did in WWII.  You can learn about slogans from WWII that we say today, but you will learn the true meaning of them.

We have a piece of a red jacket from 1812 and papers from a soldier

We have a display from the Civil War and a story of Mrs. Weaver, whose husband was injured on the frontline.  She actually met with President Lincoln and begged for permission to go to nurse her husband back to health which he granted.

You will find Fred Glor’s unit flag

Mr. Shipman’s medals from WWI.  Notice the red flag with the star, this is a replica that the Oakfield High School made and sold to remember the boys who were serving.

There is a campsite from memorabilia from Korea.  The school children tour each year and are amazed that everything a soldier had needed to fit in their duffel bag.

There are pictures from Iwo Jima.

Uniforms from WWII.

Learning how to ration.

There is a map showing the “stats” of WWII.  A Board explaining about the ration books and what it was like on the home front.  A cabinet with items from different wars and different branches of service.

You will find an aerial view showing the Village of Oakfield.  On the roof of the present Village office ther is  the name of the town and the northerly directional mark.  This was down as part of the WPA program from President Roosevelt’s administration.  The information was to be twelve foot high in black and orange letters with the village name, give the north bearing and indicate by a circle, arrow and numbers the distance and direction to the nearest airports.  This was to help pilots who at the time relied on maps that sometimes flew out the windows.  The project began in October 1935.  Ironically, during WWII many of these markings were covered over so that any spy or enemy planes could not find their way around the country.

You will see a display on Steve Cianfrini, son of Ray & Karen, who was shot down serving in Iraq.  He and his co-pilot were trapped by insurgents.  They were able to radio for help and were saved just before being captured.

They took a “Spur Ride” where they were strapped to the outside of the helicopter, a risky move but they couldn’t wait for a larger helicopter as they were in danger.

Steve’s unit was nicknamed Crazy Horse.

 

Hours of Operation

Sundays
1:00 PM -3:00 PM
(Closed on holidays)Each year, we open the first Saturday in April and close the first Saturday in December.
For a personal tour, please contact:

  • Laurie Nanni 585-948-5901 or 585-259-4145
  • Dar Warner 585-948-5500 or 585-948-5926

Please keep in mind we will need a few weeks notice.